Impact

Global Press stories are not written with the intent to cause specific instances of activism or social change. Rather, we believe that exceptional journalism gives citizens, organizations and governments little choice but to act. Our journalism gives millions of people access to authentic information that can be used to inform policy, provoke action and change minds.

  • Risks Abound, but Nepalese Workers Still Go Abroad

    National Impact
    In 2017, Senior Reporter Yam Kumari Kandel’s coverage on migrant worker rights forced Nepal’s labor ministry and its related departments to acknowledge that Nepalese employment agencies (known in Nepal as manpower agencies) often knowingly send workers into jobs abroad that have inhumane conditions. The government also now conducts raids on manpower agencies that are suspected of fraudulent activity.

  • With Economy in Shambles, Zimbabwe’s Gold Miners Risk Mercury Poisoning for Payday

    Local Impact
    After reading Reporter Linda Mujuru’s coverage on Zimbabwe miners and their high exposure to mercury poisoning, Pact Zimbabwe, a development organization working to improve the lives of small-scale and artisanal gold miners, said they will use the article to increase awareness on the danger of mercury use.

  • Alone at the Border No More: New Day Care Centers Watch Over Children of Rwandan Traders

    Local Impact
    In 2016, Reporter Janviere Uwimana uncovered the problem of working Rwandan mothers leaving their children at the DRC border. The story garnered the attention of local authorities. In 2017, the Rubavu district opened a day care center at the border in partnership with a local nonprofit.

  • Female Students Claim Discrimination Over Short Hair Policies at Some Uganda Schools

    Local Impact
    Reporter Nakisanze Segawa investigated a discriminatory hair policy in Ugandan schools that required black girls to keep their hair short while girls of other ethnicities could grow their hair long. There was significant engagement with over 500 comments that even included a thread where people were organizing a community meeting to discuss the policy. After publication, a teacher at one school featured in the story contacted Nakisanze to tell her that the policy at that school had changed. Girls are no longer required to cut their hair short, no matter their ethnicity.

  • Stranded: Nepalese Companies Abandon Workers in Qatar

    National Impact
    Reporters Shilu Manandhar and Yam Kumari Kandel investigated human rights abuses against Nepalese migrant workers in Qatar and the effect on families and communities in Nepal. Their reporting revealed that fraud, misrepresentation of work abroad, overcharging of fees and confiscating passports have been common occurrences for many of the estimated 400,000 Nepalese working in Qatar. The coverage sparked legal debate and was recently cited in a proposed bill that would offer health insurance to injured returned workers. 

  • Pushed into the Workforce by Poverty, Many Guatemalan Children Struggle to Succeed in School

    Local Impact
    Reporter Brenda Leticia Saloj investigated child labor in the rural department of Solola to determine the impact it was having on girls’ education. After the story was published, Carlos Rigoberto Pos Tuy, superintendent of the local school district, thanked Brenda for bringing this important issue into local and global conversations. He committed to investigating the issue in order to prevent more children from having to drop out of school.

  • Alerted to Hazards Posed by Open Dumping, Residents of Zambian Slum Advocate for Proper Waste Disposal

    Local Impact
    Senior Reporter Prudence Phiri reported a powerful story about the indiscriminate dumping of garbage in Kanyama, a slum outside of Lusaka, Zambia’s capital city. The story caught the attention of the local authority who used the story to spur location action. Since the story was published the Kanyama slum now has regular garbage collection services for the first time in history.

  • Long Beaten for Inattention, Some Ghanaian Children With Learning Disabilities Finally Get Effective Education

    Local Impact
    Reporter Lilly Mensah wrote a powerful story about the discrimination and even violence that children with learning disabilities face in Ghana. After the article was published, the center featured in the story, Special Attention Project (SAP), reported that media attention on the subject led to more parents coming to the center with a new understanding that children with learning disabilities should not be beaten or forced to drop out of school. Leaders at the SAP project say that Lilly’s story has helped to take away the myths surrounding learning disorders.

  • Aid Organizations Help Former Child Soldiers Heal, Adapt to Civilian Life in DRC

    Local Impact
    Reporter Noella Nyirabihogo wrote about a new program in Goma that was offering counseling, psychological support and job training to former child soldiers. Pascal Ndakavuro, a municipal worker in Goma, started researching psychological trauma and counseling options after reading her story. Armed with Noella’s article and her own research, Pascal presented an initiative that would put child psychologists on staff with the city of Goma. She presented her proposal to Mdm. Katusele, the official in charge of social affairs for the city of Goma.